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Vaginal discharge And Semen Leakage after Intercourse

Common Phases of The Intercourse

Vaginal discharge And Semen Leakage after Intercourse As you know copulation involves two people who wanted to gratify their sexual or reproductional needs. This is their one way of showing their affection and developing their relationship in a more intimate way. There are four phases of the intercourse.

  • Excitement Phase
    This occurs with physical and psychological stimulation that causes parasympathetic nerve stimulation. The vagina widens in diameter and increase in length. The nipples become erect. In men, penile erection occurs, as well as scrotal thickening and elevation of the testes.
  • Plateau Phase
    It is reached just before orgasm. In the woman, clitoris is drawn forward and retracts under the clitoral prepuce. Man’s heart rate increases to 100 to 175 beats per minute and respiratory rate approximately 40 respirations per minute.
  • Orgasm Phase
    This can occur when stimulation proceeds through the plateau stage to a point at which the body suddenly discharges accumulated sexual tension.
  • Resolution Phase
    It is the period during which the external and internal genital organs return to an unarousal state.

 

The Main Event

During the intercourse, it is inevitable for normal semen to come out from the penis of the man. Eventually man ejaculate in vagina once they reached the orgasm period. This could only shows that there is presence of sperm in vagina and the chances of semen leakage after the intercourse are considered normal. However, there are women who become oblivious if they found out that there is leaking after the final and they might think that this is the reason why they can’t have pregnancy. According to Pepper Schwartz, PhD, a sociology professor at the University of Washington, a seminal fluid leakage is a part of the intercourse; this could not mean that the woman can’t have pregnancy. The amount of the pre-ejaculate and semen ejaculated in the vagina can efficiently reach the cervix for fertilization. Not unless if the partner has premature ejaculation which is considered as a problem.

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The Problem Is Not About Leakage

If in some point of having the intercourse and there is a vaginal leaking right after intimate contact with your partner, you should try to observe the discharge after intercourse. If the semen coming out from the vagina occurs right after intercourse, this could be a part of the normal vaginal discharge. According to Laura Berman, PhD, director of the Berman Center in Chicago, she stated that a discharge after sex is comprises of 5% ejaculated sperm and 95% made up of seminal fluids. This could not fully claim as the reason for problem to infertility.

Medically speaking, if there is leakage in the vagina after intimate contact and occurs few hours to few days after the activity it is about time for the woman to do the following points:

  • Check the amount of vaginal discharge by counting the pads (if possible), they can also describe it as (mild, moderate or severe);
  • Observe if there is an increased amount of discharge;
  • Identify the color and odor of the leakage after sexual contact.

This way, it allows the woman to consult the OB Gynecologist about her condition. It can help the doctor to identify abnormal vaginal discharge or just a part of semen in vagina that leaks after sexual intercourse. The woman will be advised to undergo series of examinations including urinalysis and other serologic test for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

Diseases (STDs) can cause vaginal discharges

  • Candidiasis: Thick, cheesy-like vaginal discharges;
  • Trichomoniasis: Yellow-gray, frothy, odorous vaginal discharge;
  • Bacterial vaginosis: Thin, gray vaginal discharge with a fish-like odor;
  • Chlamydia: Heavy, gray-white discharge in the vagina;
  • Syphilis: Painless ulcer on the vulva or vagina;
  • Genital Herpes: Painful, small vesicles with erythematous base on vulva or vagina rupturing within 1 to 7 days to form ulcers;
  • Gonorrhea: Yellow-green vaginal discharge;
  • Condyloma Acuminata: Possible secondary ulceration and infection with foul odor.
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Combine It All

The pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a disease that involves different forms of sexually-transmitted diseases. It begins with a cervical infection that spreads by surface invasion along the uterine endometrium and then out to the fallopian tubes and ovaries. It is most likely to occur at the end of a menstrual period, because menstrual blood provides an excellent growth medium for bacteria and there is loss of the normal barrier of cervical mucus during this time.

The following points are signs and symptoms of PID. Instruct your partner to watch for these:

  • Fever of 101OF (38.3 OC);
  • Purulent vaginal discharge;
  • Painful intercourse;
  • Abdominal or pelvic pain;
  • Suprapubic tenderness or guarding;
  • Tenderness on bimanual examination;

 

The Worst Of All is The Cervical Cancer

The cervical cancer is the third most common cause of the female reproductive tract. Pre-invasive cancers range from minimal cervical dysplasia, in which the lower third of the epithelium contains abnormal cells, to carcinoma in situ, in which the full thickness of the epithelium contains abnormally proliferating cells.

What To Look For?

  • Abnormal bleeding;
  • Prolonged menstrual period or intermittent bleeding;
  • Bleeding following intercourse;
  • Difficulty voiding, urinary urgency, hematuria, rectal bleeding (direct invasion of the bladder and rectum);
  • Lower extremity edema;
  • Serosanguineous discharge (uncommon).
Delores C. West is a compassionate healthcare professional with a focus on women's health and wellness. As a certified nurse-midwife, Delores is dedicated to providing comprehensive care to women throughout their reproductive journey. With a warm and nurturing approach, she empowers her patients to make informed decisions about their health and well-being. Delores's expertise in women's health makes her a trusted resource for individuals seeking personalized and compassionate care. Connect with her on LinkedIn to learn more about her commitment to women's health and wellness.